Areas of Focus

Our core services cover four key areas


Education

Education equips Australians with the knowledge, understanding, skills and values to take advantage of the opportunities of this era, and face its challenges, with confidence.

Australia’s capacity to provide a high quality of life for all citizens in the 21st century will depend on its ability to compete in the global economy on knowledge and innovation.

Our vision for Education is to improve learning outcomes across all stages, by bettering access to education and training and the highest levels of teacher quality. We have demonstrated expertise in:

  • Evaluating policies and programs, particularly professional learning initiatives for educational professionals.
  • Providing strategic advice in the often complex context of education
  • Developing creative targeted communications
  • Longitudinal studies on program

Our work covers all aspects of education and training (including early childhood education, the school years, further education and training, and higher education) across all sectors (government, business, Catholic and independent schools and private training providers) and all Australian jurisdictions.

 


 

Justice

Designing, evaluating and helping people create pathways out of injustice and disadvantage.

We work with the system as well as the people to make them better. We involve the community and systems (police, legal agencies, corrections) to provide better opportunities for all.

Sexual assault and family violence are prevalent, serious and preventable. Our sexual assault and family violence focus area produces influential work that contributes to the elimination of sexual assault and family violence.

Research shows that the vast majority of sexual assault and family violence incidents are perpetrated by men against women and their children, although both women and men can be victims and/or perpetrators.

Our work is informed by a theoretical understanding of the complex power of relations between people, families, communities and systems that we live and work within.  We consider and navigate the many structural and individual factors such as gender, race, education and culture and how they intersect and influence each other to affect social justice outcomes.

 


 

Community

Our work is inspired by a belief that everyone has a right to participate in their community.

Community programs like sport and art play an important role in supporting and achieving positive outcomes for Australian communities and recent efforts by government and various community organisations have had great success in harnessing this.

Community Participation covers a vast array of activities that promote and sustain communities where people participate fully in social, economic and civic life but we also need to understand exclusionary measures and how people can be marginalized or excluded from society.

We work with clients to understand challenges and barriers that prevent inclusion and participation and why they exist.

We have provided evaluation and strategic advice in projects that aim to address access, gender, ability, sexuality, social and financial capital and investment in community program and policy.

 


 

Health and Wellbeing

Our holistic and systemic approach aims to empower people to enhance their mental and physical, social and community wellbeing.

Our approach to health and wellbeing acknowledges its multi-faceted and the impact of various environmental, economic, and social factors. Consistent with this approach, our research and evaluation in the area of health and wellbeing incorporates our understanding and analysis of the social, economic, cultural, and physical that contribute to the wellbeing of an individual, as well as that of a community.

Our approach to understanding wellbeing in any piece of research or evaluation we conduct is not restricted to the wellbeing of the individual, but encompasses families, different communities (e.g. abilities, gender, sexuality, mental and physical health, addiction and addictive behaviours) and larger systemic variables.